Talent Development

Public Preschool Enrollment (percentage)

Measure Baseline (2015) Current Target (2025) Trend Michigan Chart
Public preschool enrollment (percentage) Disaggregated 34% 35% 100%

Rationale: “High quality universal pre-K for three- and four-year-olds could significantly reduce the financial burden facing families with young children and help ensure that children are prepared for kindergarten.” When universal PreK is articulated as a goal, it largely can be achieved, as evidenced in states such as WV, VT, WI, AL, NY, IL. Source: https://www.newamerica.org/in-depth/care-report/policy-recommendations-universal-pre-k/http://nieer.org/wp-content/uploads/2018/04/YB2017_Executive-Summary.pdf

17%
White 26% 26% 14%
Black 38% 37% 29%
Latino 19% 40% 22%
About this measure

From Perry Preschool to EduCare, from Head Start (including Early Head Start) to Family Friends Neighbor Care (FFN), decades of research and practices have demonstrated the tremendous return on investments in adequate access to high quality early childhood education (ECE). The impact is shown not only in preparing children to be ready for school, but also in creating a smarter, stronger, healthier and more productive America. Enrolling in Michigan’s public preschool is an indicator of access to quality ECE, partially due to the implementation of Michigan State Board of Education (SBE) approved Early Childhood Standards of Quality for Prekindergarten (ECSQ-PK). The standards can be found here.

Resources for this measure

Here are a variety of resources to help community members learn more about our area schools and programs:

About the data

Definition: Percent of children ages 3 and 4 enrolled in public state-funded preschool.
Numerator: Children ages 3 and 4 enrolled in Great Start Readiness Program (GSRP) and in Head Start/GSRP blend program.
Denominator: Total children ages 3 and 4.
Frequency: Annual.
Baseline: 34%
Target: 100%
Rationale: “High quality universal pre-K for three- and four-year-olds could significantly reduce the financial burden facing families with young children and help ensure that children are prepared for kindergarten.” When universal PreK is articulated as a goal, it largely can be achieved, as evidenced in states such as WV, VT, WI, AL, NY, IL.
Source: Michigan Department of Education (enrollment). U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 5-year estimates (3 & 4 year old).