Jobs

Unemployment rate

Measure Baseline (2015) Current Target (2025) Trend Michigan Chart
Unemployment rate Disaggregated 12% 10% 6%

Rationale: This is the second lowest unemployment rate among a set of nine Midwestern cities of comparable size, demographics, and education levels; we chose this instead of the median given the fast decline in the unemployment rate in recent years.Source: PolicyLink analysis of demographic data from the US Census.

9%
White 11% 9% - 7%
Black 19% 16% - 18%
Latino 7% 4% - 11%
American Indian or Alaskan Native 7% 7% - 13%
Asian N/A N/A - 6%
Some other race 8% 7% - 11%
Two or more races 24% 16% - 15%

About this measure

The unemployment rate represents the proportion of Battle Creek residents ages 16 and over who are available and actively looking for work but have not found employment. It is a critical measure for assessing the well-being of people and families and the health of the economy because it shows the extent to which the working-age population is connected to the economy. Racial inequities in the unemployment rate reflect persistent inequities in the labor market, including employer discrimination as well as the fact that workers of color are hit first and worst by economic downturns and often are the “last hired and first fired.” A declining unemployment rate indicates that more workers who have been locked out of the labor market are finding work.

Resources for this measure

Here are a variety of resources to help community members learn more about our labor force participation rate:

If you need help finding employment, contact Michigan Works! SW at (269) 660-1412.

About the data

Definition: The percent of workers in the labor force who are unemployed.
Numerator: Civilian population age 16 years currently not working and in the labor force (has actively sought employment in the past four weeks).
Denominator: Population age 16 years and over in the labor force.
Frequency: Annual.
Baseline: 12%
Target: 6%
Rationale: This is the second lowest unemployment rate among a set of nine Midwestern cities of comparable size, demographics, and education levels; we chose this instead of the median given the fast decline in the unemployment rate in recent years.
Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 5-year samples.